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it is embarrassing to compared government funding for amtrak with u.s. government funding for domestic aviation and highway speed passenger >> to build and maintain one of the best highways systems in the world, we've spent $114 billion and built it over 45 years and today it would be $126 billion. con jex on our roads are at historic levels and by 2020 urban interstates will be at or over capacity. and anyone who has had the pleasure of flying recently they know the problems that plag our nation's airport ch airports, in fact, in spite of all this amtrak carries more riders from new york to boston than all other airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of hig
legislation he's sponsoring which will allow more highly skilled immigrants the u.s. that's live at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> i think riders institute is something that's important within the culture. we are a culture of words of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page of writing but i think that there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film. but there is something in literature that cap chures the hunal spirit. >> this weekend join book tv as we look tpwhind scenes at the literary life of new york's capital city albany. >> senators from new york and new jersey say hurricane sandy caused $5 billion worth of damage to rail subway and port infrastructure in their state. they testified on surface transportation yesterday. >> i call this hearing to order. thank you for joining us, mr. secretary. i asked you to testify today because i'm deeply concerned about the recent report that the f.h.a. could potentially need taxpayer support for the first time in its 78-year histo
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
the u.s. president should take a in terms of a more realistic, short-term approach to facing challenges are a long term visionary approach where the focus is on the future and where we are going in the next 10-20 years. which of the following approaches to you think a u.s. presidential candidate should take? you will see two options. should a u.s. president take a practical approach and difficult times addressing near-term challenges or a visionary approach focusing on long-term goals for the future and not losing perspective of where we want to go to? go ahead and text to 22333. the response code you agree with et.you can tweak at @gt we will see if it matches the opinion poll. a fair size minority, about the 44% felt short-term obstacles was the important focus of the nation. it looks like once again we have come close to the national poll with 67% of the audience i in the room and online voting for a visionary approach looking at long-term goals for the country instead of a short-term perspective. i think this would be another good thing for elected officials to keep a in mind as the
. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daugh
at the calendar, but we are about of time here, folks. this is not funny. people's livelihoods are at stake. the u.s. economy is at stake. millions of families are counting on us to do something. tois the president's job find a solution that can pass the congress. he is the only one who can do it. this is not john boehner's problem to solve. he has done his part. he has bent over backwards. mr. president, how about rallying in your party around a solution? i have said many times before -- we cannot solve the problems we face unless or until the president of the united states either finds the will or develops the ability to lead. this is a moment that calls for presidential leadership. that is the way out of this. it is that simple. does anybody wonder why we keep going from crisis to crisis around here? anybody notice a pattern? this does not have to be a crisis. this is an opportunity. once again, the president ignored it. he held rallies and partisan speeches after he had been reelected. as i said yesterday, i think it is obvious that the president wants to go off the cliff. i know most of the ame
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. we'rere talking months, talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors
different laws than we do. if there say technology drain, it's also in terms of the u.s. laws we only prohibit certain type of technology that has to do with national security and technology. but when you talk in steve's case the talent of the invite tive things that get sucked out along with that, that's nobody really talks about that so i'd like to hear from you. >> it's true. what you are saying is true. it goes back to what i was saying the other countries are being a magnet for talent, there is no question about this so we have to recognize that is happening and make sure we're competitive. my own view is if people want to come here and get an education and go back to their country, fine, that is a way to build stronger committees in other parts of the world. that is part of our stated policy. having people come here if they want to go back and start companies there, that's fine. but we should at least give them the option of staying here. if they want to go back fine, but don't force them. encourage them to stay because we need smart people here working on these new technologies
superstorm sandy swept across the east coast. 24 u.s. states were in some way affected by sandy. the storm killed at least 131 people in eight states. hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses were damaged or destroyed. the unprecedented disaster caused billions of dollars in loss and economic disruption. just two weeks after hurricane katrina hit the gulf coast, this congress approved more than $62 billion in federal aid to help the devastated area get back on its feet. after hurricanes ike and gustav hit in 2008, a supplemental proacheses bill passed this congress overwhelmingly. all of these aid packages were approved by strong bipartisan majorities in both chambers. the results were obvious and the speed imperative. we need to pass it. nothing has changed. that is what we did for others. that's what we need to do to help this devastated area. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from ohio rise? ms. kaptur: to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. kaptur: t
creation. for each of these visas that are granted, it is estimated that there'll be three additional u.s. jobs created. for each of these individuals who apply, they will look at who the student population is in the united states working on masters and phd's and stem areas. this of be at a diverse population. this cause us to see this as an improvement in diversity outreach. almost anyone who attends a graduation at the masters and phd level, you will see those crossing the line coming from all over the world and in all colors and sizes. that is why we did this today. we want this to be one that says, who wants to come to be america and has a likelihood of success in creating success for all americans? >> today is an important day. it is the beginning of what we need to do for the next two years on immigration. he will work on bees as an jobs, but most importantly we will work on the angst that are important for america. i want to remind all of you that the democrats had two years to do something about immigration reform. they had the white house, the house, and the senate. they did noth
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
as the third longest serving member of the u.s. senate in our nation's history. he served as a defender of the people of this country, championing historic charges forceable rights, equal rights for asian americans, african americans, and native hawaiians. it is an incredible understatement to call him an institution. this chamber will never be the same without him. i remember in our childhood in hawaii, hawaii is a diversified place. where i lived, there were many japanese families that live around us. there were many nights i spent sleeping in the homes of japanese families. eating their food, sleeping on the floor. i was really brought up with the japanese families. when the war broke out, i couldn't understand what was happening. there were families that were removed from the community and at that time,but they pursued iy wanted to serve this country as well. this is why in my time in congress, i did focus on trying to help the japanese americans in this country and asians in this country. and to help them achieve what they really aren't. i remember seeking the medal of honor for th
problems facing state governments live from the u.s. chamber of commerce at 9:00 eastern. up next, today's headlines and calls live on "washington journal." in about 45 minutes, we will continue to look at the so- called fiscal cliff and the budget cuts that take place in january. after that, we will examine the po
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13